Visit the top 10 festivals in mexico

Visit the top 10 festivals in mexico

iVisa | Updated on Oct 15, 2021

On November 2nd Mexicans celebrate the “Dia de Los Muertos”, a 3-day festival that brings together families from all over the country to celebrate the life of their dead.

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However, to travel to Mexico you need to apply in advance for the Mexico Tourist Card. You can apply for this document at iVisa.com it is a simple application you can do on any electronic device.

Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead! Read all about it in our FAQs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a vaccine to travel to Mexico?

Yes! The CDC and WHO recommend travelers getting vaccinated against Typhoid, Cholera, Rabies, Hepatitis A, and Hepatitis B before arriving in Mexico.

Additionally, the COVID-19 vaccine is also suggested, but not mandatory, to ensure a safe journey. Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead! Enjoy this celebration with all your vaccines up to date.

Do I need a PCR Test to travel to Mexico?

No, you don't but air passengers returning to the U.S. must carry a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours before departure and present it at the airport counter.

Don't waste vacation time searching for a COVID-19 test center, just simplify testing by ordering the eMed self-testing COVID-19 kit online. Pack the test in your suitcase and self-test no more than 3 days prior to your flight back to the US.

Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead! COVID-19 tests ensure safety during the festivities.

Do I have to quarantine upon arrival in Mexico?

At the moment, there are no quarantine regulations.

Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead! Follow all COVID-19 health regulations.

What is the Mexico Tourist Card, and how to apply for it?

The Mexico Tourist Card is a travel authorization document that tourists need to carry with them to enter the country for any tourism purposes. This document is for a Single Entry only and allows you to stay for a maximum of 180 days after arrival.

Just follow these 3 simple steps to apply for the Mexico Tourist Card:

  • Step 1: Fill in our online questionnaire, then select the processing alternative that fits you best.
  • Step 2: Check that all your personal information is correct before choosing your payment method.
  • Step 3: Finally, scan and upload the required documents.

Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead. Acquire all your travel documents with iVisa.com

What are the application processing costs for the Mexico Tourist Card?

There are 3 alternatives for you to choose from depending on your travel needs.

  • Standard Processing: 24 hours - USD 20.00
  • Rush Processing: 4 hours - USD 40.00
  • Super Rush Processing: 30 minutes - USD 60.00

Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead, read more below.

What do I need to submit to apply for the Mexico Tourist Card?

  • Passport information page.
  • Your current email address so you can receive the Mexico Tourist Card.
  • The payment method can be credit or debit card. Festivals in Mexico: The celebration of the day of the dead - It is an easy application, apply for the Mexico Tourist Card with iVisa.com

Can I trust iVisa.com?

Yes! iVisa.com has an information processing system that allows us to keep all your personal information confidential. Hundreds of customers trust us and you can read all about it in our review section.

What can I do if I have more questions about the Mexico Tourist Card?

If you have any questions, you can always connect with our customer service agents. They are available at any time.

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Visit Mexico and enjoy one of the most interesting and cultural festivities in Latin America. The Day of the Dead is a very different holiday from Halloween. While Halloween is full of candy and costumes, the Day of the Dead brings a constant celebration with a different denotation.

This annual holiday is celebrated from the night of November 1st until the following day, in some parts of Mexico it can last up to a week. Among some of the activities that take place during this festivity are the decoration of skulls, tombs, and altars; there are also parades, called the Great Procession of the Catrinas, where the participants are dressed in typical costumes of the country and their faces are painted like skeletons.

This costume with the skeleton painting represents the dead who are no longer with them and is a way to venerate them in life and celebrate both their time alive and dead. Legend has it that, although the body no longer exists, the spirit is still present, and always will be as long as there is a family to remember and celebrate it.