The Basics of How Citizens of New Zealand Can Enter Singapore During Coronavirus

The Basics of How Citizens of New Zealand Can Enter Singapore During Coronavirus

iVisa | Updated on Jan 08, 2021

Singapore’s gradual re-opening of its borders is seen as a good sign by many amidst the turmoil caused by the pandemic. With agreements that it made with certain countries and regions, Singapore is confident that the new entry procedures will simplify international travel, and protect its visitors and citizens alike from the importation of diseases and other health concerns.

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It should be noted that those traveling to Singapore should be ready to pay at least $300 for COVID testing. As for how citizens of New Zealand can enter Singapore during coronavirus, it’s quite easy since the country is one of only two whose travelers can enter Singapore without the need for a Stay Home Notice or quarantine procedures. The other is Brunei Darussalam.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the entry requirements for visitors from New Zealand?

As of September 1st, 2020, visitors from New Zealand are required to apply for an Air Travel Pass or ATP**. This single-entry document replaces the Health Declaration Form that other nationalities are required to.

Eligible travelers need to factor in the release date of the document with their arrival date when they book their flights to Singapore. This is why they must apply for the Pass between 7 and 30 days from their date of entry.

Does the visitor’s travel history matter?

Travel history matters more than nationality in this subject. Singapore requires a traveler to stay in New Zealand for the last 14 days before entering the host country. Every traveler must also book flights without transiting in other countries in order to qualify for the Air Travel Pass and the no-quarantine rule.

What documents should I present upon arrival at the airport?

If you are eligible for the ATP, you should have one ready upon inspection (upon check-in before departure and when you arrive at the Singapore checkpoint). The document can be presented as a hard copy or as a soft copy on your mobile, and it must coincide with the date of your stay in Singapore.

The other document that you should have is a visa if your passport requires that you have one for entry into Singapore. This is why you should check for visa requirements, and learn how citizens of New Zealand can enter Singapore during coronavirus, prior to your trip so you don’t waste time and money with a botched entry.

Is the COVID testing required and when do I need it?

Yes, even for travelers who are not required to go on quarantine, the COVID test is required. The PCR test is done pre-entry upon arrival at the airport. It costs $300 and this includes the tax for goods and services. The traveler will assume the cost of the test and the result will be out within 2 days, so all travelers are encouraged to pre-book the procedure. This is done in lieu of applying for the Health Declaration Form.

What other things do I need to have before to complete the entry process?

Aside from the Pass and a visa (if needed), all travelers, even the ones from New Zealand and Brunei, should have an app called TraceTogether installed on their mobile phones. This app is used by Singapore health and border authorities for contact tracing if there is indeed somebody with COVID who was allowed inside the country’s borders. They are also required to have the app running up to 14 days after they left Singapore.

Is it safe to apply for the Air Travel Pass with iVisa.com?

Considering the years of experience and committed personnel that iVisa.com has, it is safe to say that it is the best travel document website on the Internet. And there is also the fact that iVisa.com’s security app protects all customer information from unauthorized access.

What’s the best way of reaching out to you?

You can use iVisa.com’s chat feature to get in touch with us. You can also send your questions through email and drop it at help@ivisa.com. And feel free to go to the website for more information.

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